Nick Saban shares his thoughts on NIL in college football


On the eve of another national championship appearance, Alabama coach Nick Saban was asked how recent name, image and likeness legislation has changed his handling of the Crimson Tide this season.

“Well, the name, the image and the likeness is a positive thing for the players. They have the opportunity to make money, which they have always had the opportunity to do. It gives them the opportunity. to do it using their name and image and likeness, which I don’t think is a bad thing, ”Saban told reporters.

More than a dozen Alabama soccer players signed NIL deals last summer, including Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback Bryce Young, who signed a deal with the CAA for his NIL representation.

While he acknowledged how positive NIL was for the players, Saban also expressed some hesitation about his impact.

“I think what’s a little worrying is how it allows players to decide where they go at school, because I don’t think that’s the intention,” Saban said. “I don’t think that would be the intention of the NCAA. I think we probably need some sort of national legislation to control that to some extent, because I think there will be an imbalance over who can dominate college football if it isn’t regulated in one way or another. “

Georgia coach Kirby Smart also shared his thoughts on the topic, saying, “You’re going to have the haves and have-nots and the separations that already exist are going to get bigger.

“And the schools that have the capacity and the capacity and that are more competitive in the NIL market will be schools that are ahead of other schools.”

The National Championship will be held on Monday, January 10, with a kick-off scheduled at 8 p.m. ET.

More college football coverage:

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• Three years after the start of the talks, can the expansion of the PSC overcome its obstacles?
• Movie theater: what should Georgia do differently this time against Alabama?
• Why did the southern teams dominate the CFP? Follow the money and history


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